Exquisite names those women

Exquisite memories, those women warriors (for Dec.06 in the year of the reign

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*

And found him, six inches, soaked in the gutter : [   ]   [   ]   [   ].

And you, [   ], brought me chai, driving x town.

This morning, snow covered ground, that train, east-bound.cropped-perimeter-is-the-not-spoken-1.jpg

Tripwire 12 * AKA Vancouver: Writings from the Unceded Territories

My long poem, THOT-J-BAP, appears in Issue 12, of Oakland, CA’s Tripwire (David Buuck, editor) in a feature on Vancouver writers, including…

Jordan AbelGeorge BoweringLouis CabriJeff DerksenAmy D’AthMercedes EngRyan FitzpatrickSonnet L’Abbe, Danielle LaFranceChristine LeclercDonato ManciniRolf Maurerrob mclennanCecily NicholsonLisa Robertson, Stephen CollisFred WahRita Wong, and others…

…along with a special tribute to Peter Culley. Thrilled to keep this company and Unceded.

Issue Available Here

Those Who Make Us – Canadian Creature, Myth, and Monster Stories

As a creative writing instructor, I’m always curious about the different genres through which we find expression, and I’m always learning from my students: no doubt about it, speculative fiction figures a lot in their imaginations. Here’s my debut into that world, a short story “Antony’s Arboretum” published this year in Exile Edition’s Those Who Make Us: Canadian Creature, Myth, and Monster Stories

those-who-make-us exile editions

Description:

“What resides beneath the blankets of snow, under the ripples of water, within the whispers of the wind, and between the husks of trees all across Canada? Creatures, myths and monsters are everywhere…even if we don’t always see them.

This is a unique and powerful collection of all-new, cross-genre tales that take the reader into real and imagined worlds, ranging from an encounter with the Metis creature Rugaru to trolls dissatisfied with modern life, to the demons who follow us from our parents’ countries, and to Anishinaabe myths about the creation of creeks. Eightteen emerging and award-winning authors explore the way we think about and interact with the unnatural ­ showing how much the stories we create can teach us about what it means to be human.” – 

Thanks to Kelsi Morris and Kaitlin Tremblay for putting together this amazing anthology.

Find It Here

The Book That Changed Your Life – Georgia Straight

slave-of-the-hunsHere’s a piece I did for the Georgia Straight back in September. These few hundred words took me three months to write, but I number them among my best work this year. Thank you for Brian Lynch for allowing me the time……

Slave of the Huns by the Hungarian writer Géza Gárdonyi, first published in 1901, brought out in English by Corvina Press in the late ’60s: the book as mysterious object, to hold, to divine. A red cover, with ink drawings by Victor C. Ambrus, the novel sat on a shelf in my father’s library up at the manse in the town of towns…”

Read the Rest Here

Touch the Donkey supplement #62 : 7 questions on Thot-J-Bap

An interview with rob mclennan in supplement #62 of Touch the Donkey around my suite of poems published back in July. Here’s an excerpt:

Q: Tell me about the suite of poems that appear in Touch the Donkey. What is thecanadaproject, and how do you see the work-in-progress volume 2 extending or expanding upon the work of the first?

A: The suite of poems that appear in Touch the Donkey are excerpted from a sequence, “Bartholomew in the compound, the bees” and this suite of poems lies nestled in the second completed series from thecanadaproject, which is a book length poem, the heart of this journey bears all patterns, commonly known as Thot-J-Bap. The Touch the Donkey suite contains pieces of a collaborative work I’ve embarked on with the Governor General award winning scientist, Dr. Mark Winston: he’s given me access to his scientific work on the honey bee and he and I are working on a set of poems and prose readings that we’ve performed in Vancouver.

Thot-J-Bap is populated by a vast connection of characters, a sampling of which you will see in the excerpt included. The journey of Thot-J-Bap, over the course of decades, indeed, even, eons, explores an imaginary territory, Pacifica, loosely based on British Columbia and the Pacific North West/ Cascadia, as well as the cities of Toronto, Paris, Baghdad and Ahmedabad, and that exploration includes an investigation of various shibboleths: East v West, Empire v other, description v representation, and language in translation, the syntax of the fragment.”

touch-the-donkey

Read the Full Interview

Ontario Poet Chris Turnbull creates visual art with THOT-J-BAP

Ontario poet and visual artist, Chris Turnbull, inscribes language into and on to objects, into the world around outside her rural home.

Here, a few photographs and comment-fragments about her process with poems from THOT-J-BAP: 

birch-back-in-perpetua
to discover and discover and think…COOL…text…
where-language_is-a-place-saklikar
–laid out on a couple of boards in the garage…
birch-back-in-perpetua
–ended up transcribing via handwriting onto the inner portion of piece of birch bark.

Chris invited me to read the entire Nous-Zot chapbook into an audio file, which Chris says “over time it will ‘replace’ the birch bark pieces, because they’ll erode and the text will change or the birch will drift in the cube.

Eventually, there’ll just be birch bark again, but your voice will be there in the qr-code format.”

Chris Turnbull’s work with THOT-J-BAP will be installed at the end of September 2016 at 4elementslivingarts.org

For more information about the Elements festival, please visit: http://4elementslivingarts.org/workshops-and-classes/2092/ 

More about the poetic and visual arts practice of Canadian poet Christ Turnbull:

My Poetry Foundation Interview with Paolo Javier

R-Saklikar-Surrey-Poet-Laureate-photo-by-J-Janzen
Image by J Janzen

Now live, my interview on Poetry Foundation’s blog “Harriet” with guest editor Paolo Javier, former poet laureate of Queens, NY. Here’s an excerpt:

PJ: …Could we talk about your formative years in Surrey/New West? Specifically, when did you start writing poetry, and who were your early inspirations? I imagine living in New West, which is a stone’s throw from the Fraser River, must have some influence in terms of your notion of, well…I’ll let you take it from here.

RSS: I love that phrase, “formative years”: they seem to take the long view with me. Heh. I’ve always had this chronicle-compulsion, just didn’t realize for a long time, that my addiction to writing things down was part of a writing practice, was what defined me as a writer: images, sounds, rhythms, always these were in-coming to me and I took them, language-bits: held, rubbed, stored, taken-out again. My father reading me Mother Goose Nursery rhymes, me, a copy-cat, inventing my own. Scribbling.

So, early inspirations: fairy-tales, nursery rhymes, TV adverts, street signage, dictionaries, the sound of my parents’ speaking/arguing in English-Gujarati (my mother’s mother tongue); the sound of how Other People spoke.

New West when I grew up there, was a well-settled place in the sense of its relation to the colonial history of the province, The Royal City, and as the daughter of a United Church Minister, I settled into place, if that makes sense. My first book, children of air india, un/authorized exhibits and interjections (Nightwood Editions, 2013), explores this idea a fair bit…

And yes, always, the river: I can’t get away from it. Every time I cross The Fraser into/out of Surrey, I have to look up, look at those grey waters, effluent-filled, that deep undertow current: I grew up hearing stories about the grasp of that current, how she’d take you in…”

Read Our Conversation Here

Lunch Poems at SFU: Christine Stewart and Peter Quartermain

Christine Stewart & Peter Quartermain

Lunch Poems is a SFU Public Square program, connecting the city with poets – a great place to bring your lunch and your questions about poetry. There’s always a Q & A after the reading.

The light in the Teck Gallery at SFU’s Harbour Centre Campus is beautiful, the vibe is friendly and relaxed.

And we always end on time.

Learn More Here

March 10: Surrey Poet Laureate Writing Consults

I’ll be doing another writing consultation this Friday at the Semiahmoo Arts Centre in South Surrey.

Semiahmoo Arts Centre
Image from http://www.semiahmooarts.com/

Renée will read your manuscript before your 45-minute meeting. At the meeting, she may provide you with suggestions about editing, how to publish your work, and how to work with editors and publishers. “

Visit the Surrey Library website to schedule a session. I look forward to reading your work!