Lunch Poems at SFU: Jami Macarty & Marguerite Pigeon

Lunch Poems Nov 2017

Lunch Poems connects the city with poets – a great place to bring your lunch and your questions about poetry. There’s always a Q & A after the reading.

The light in the Teck Gallery at SFU’s Harbour Centre Campus is beautiful, the vibe is friendly and relaxed.

And we always end on time.

Where: Teck Gallery, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hasting Street, Vancouver

When: Nov 15 at 12:00pm

Learn More Here

THOT-J-BAP: extractions from Nomados Press

This week on Friday, I’ll be launching my new chapbook, THOT-J-BAP: extractions from Nomados Press alongside Marguerite Pigeon and her chapbook, My Model Poem.

Nomados Press Thot-J-Bap

Like the bees who populate it, Saklikar’s THOT-J-BAP is humming, productive, and vital, performing an urgent gathering of specimens amassed, dissipated, and recollected from which it extracts ‘those gems they would steal’: fragments of stories, of love, of violence, of remembering, of ‘what once was, compressed.’ This is fecund, fabulous work.”

–  Catriona Strang

I always have my eye out for a truly ambitious poetry—and here it is, epic in scope, running through its own newly-created dimension just outside of recognizable time and space, a mobile world moving by, line by line, touching “what hurts, what helps, what heals,” transformed. Saklikar manages a near perfect merger of forward-momentum narrative and paratactic detail where each word is a hypnotically pronounced incantation, the story pulled into glittering erotic fragments, each piece a world in itself, glowing, refracting, the ambition of the part to overwhelm the whole. THOT-J-BAP is poetry to lose and find yourself in. I’m hooked.” 

– Stephen Collis

Date: Friday, November 3 at 8 PM – 10 PM
Time: 8:00-10:00pm
Location: People’s Co-op Bookstore, 1391 Commercial Drive, Vancouver

Click Here for More Details

 

The 2017 bpNichol Chapbook Award‏ Shortlist

Bpnichol shortlist 2017Delighted to announce that my chapbook After the Battle of Kingsway, the bees–, was shortlisted for the 2017 bpNichol Chapbook Award‏:

The prize, awarded annually since 1985, goes to the author of the best poetry chapbook – in the estimation of the judges – published in Canada in the previous year and submitted for consideration. It is named in honour of the late poet, novelist, mentor, and micropress publisher bpNichol (1944–1988).

The $4,000 prize purse, donated by an anonymous benefactor, makes this the richest annual literary award for a poetry chapbook, specified as a collection of no more than 48 pages. The publisher of the winning title also receives $500, thanks to an annual donation by Toronto writers Brian Dedora and Jim Smith.

Judges Helen Guri of Montréal, Québec, and Hoa Nguyen of Toronto, Ontario, chose the finalists from more than 60 submissions from across the country.

The finalists for the 2017 bpNichol Chapbook Award are:

Dana Claxton. The Patient Storm. above/ground press
Doris Fiszer. The Binders. Tree Press
Stevie Howell. Summer. Desert Pets Press
Sonnet L’Abbé. Anima Canadensis. Junction Books
Nanci Lee. Preparation. FreeFall Literary Society of Calgary
Renee Sarojini Saklikar. After the Battle of Kingsway, the bees. above/ground press

The winner will be announced at 2 p.m. on November 18, 2017, at the annual Meet the Presses Indie Literary Market, open from 12 noon to 5 p.m. at Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor Street West, in Toronto. The Market introduces the public to independent literary publishers of books, chapbooks, magazines, ephemera, and recordings generally not available in bookstores. The free event is curated by Meet the Presses, a volunteer literary collective devoted to showcasing the work of independent publishers of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.”

The Capilano Review’s 7th Annual Robin Blaser Contest

The Capilano Review invites entries for its 7th Annual Robin Blaser award, to be judged by Wayde Compton.

Statement from this year’s judge, Wayde Compton:

That which is “avant-garde” can be socially progressive or regressive, just as that which extends a tradition can be either as well. So “the new” isn’t necessarily the utopian key it’s often assumed to be, and “the old” is not always that which is best left behind. I’m most curious, in this time, about poetry that disregards this binary, and instead productively questions any lineage of influence.”

About the Judge: 

Wayde Compton
Photo by Ayelet Tsabari

Wayde Compton writes poetry, fiction, and essays. Three of his books — The Outer HarbourAfter Canaan, and The Revolving City — were finalists for the City of Vancouver Book Award, and the former won in 2015. His book 49th Parallel Psalm was a finalist for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. In 2002, Compton co-founded the Hogan’s Alley Memorial Project, an organization dedicated to the public memory of Vancouver’s historical black community, and he is a member of the Northeast False Creek Stewardship Group. Compton is the program director of Creative Writing at Simon Fraser University Continuing Studies, where he administrates the Writer’s Studio and the Southbank Writer’s Program.

  • Revised Deadline: October 7th, 2017
  • Award: $500 + publication in the Fall issue, TCR 3.33.
  • Fee: $25 for Canadian entries, $35 for US/international entries
  • Length: Maximum 6 pages per entry.

Submit your work here

A Review of After the Battle of Kingsway, the bees

After the battle of kingsway, the bees
Image from above/ground press.

Thanks to Subterranean Blue Poetry for doing a review of my chapbook, After the Battle of Kingsway, the bees:

“…The long poem begins in aftermath, perhaps a broken love affair, an argument, escalated into war, has ceded into the depths of time. A fascinating play with language and concepts, the images of bees hover in the background as if painted into different dimensions of time overlapping, the poem works on different levels, as if in parallel realities. In the work, bee images surface, sometimes as if the protagonists in the story are bees and there are images of bees, the inside of nests, the making of wax enclaves for honey. A magic symbol in pagan mythology, symbolizing the productivity of the community, fertility and royal enclaves, the imagery weaves an allusion to bloodlines and the tenacity of the human spirit in adversity. As if a comment on the strained cultural way of the West during the Industrialized Economy and the ensuing violence in personal relationships with whispers of the reclaiming of Holy Spirit tenets and cultural knowledge in the New Computerized Society beginning to recreate peace…”

Read the Review Here

Sept 22: The Capilano Review Issue Launch

Excited to be reading new THOT-J-BAP poems at the latest TCR issue launch!

TCR 3.32

You are invited to attend the launch of Issue 3.32 featuring readings by Lisa RobertsonRenée Sarojini Saklikar, Michael Barnholden, Olga Garcia and Danielle LaFrance plus more!”

  • Date: Friday, September 22, 2017
  • Time: 7:00pm -10:00pm
  • Address: 281 Industrial AvenueVancouver, BC, V6A 2P2

Click Here for More Details

Sept 14 & 15: Remembering Air India Book Launch

New from University of Alberta Press, Remembering Air India:

On June 23, 1985, the bombing of Air India Flight 182 killed 329 people, most of them Canadians. Today this pivotal event in Canada’s history is hazily remembered, yet certain interests have shaped how the tragedy is woven into public memory, and even exploited to advance a strategic national narrative. Remembering Air India insists that we “remember Air India otherwise.” This collection investigates the Air India bombing and its implications for current debates about racism, terrorism, and citizenship. Drawing together academic analysis, testimony, visual arts, and creative writing, this innovative volume tenders a new public record of the bombing, one that shows how important creative responses are for deepening our understanding of the event and its aftermath.”

Book launch details in Toronto and Hamilton:

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Click here for More Book Launch details

Surrey Stories Connect: Teens and Seniors Write Surrey Photos

Friday May 12, 2017: evening, up in Room 418, Surrey City Centre public library, writers and friends celebrated the launch of this book: a time-capsule of Surrey, Autumn 2016, through the writings of seniors and youth from the Cloverdale, Strawberry Hill areas of Surrey as well as at Historic Stewart Farm. Co-edited by Meghan Savage and Renee Sarojini Saklikar:

My Poetry Foundation Interview with Paolo Javier

R-Saklikar-Surrey-Poet-Laureate-photo-by-J-Janzen
Image by J Janzen

Now live, my interview on Poetry Foundation’s blog “Harriet” with guest editor Paolo Javier, former poet laureate of Queens, NY. Here’s an excerpt:

PJ: …Could we talk about your formative years in Surrey/New West? Specifically, when did you start writing poetry, and who were your early inspirations? I imagine living in New West, which is a stone’s throw from the Fraser River, must have some influence in terms of your notion of, well…I’ll let you take it from here.

RSS: I love that phrase, “formative years”: they seem to take the long view with me. Heh. I’ve always had this chronicle-compulsion, just didn’t realize for a long time, that my addiction to writing things down was part of a writing practice, was what defined me as a writer: images, sounds, rhythms, always these were in-coming to me and I took them, language-bits: held, rubbed, stored, taken-out again. My father reading me Mother Goose Nursery rhymes, me, a copy-cat, inventing my own. Scribbling.

So, early inspirations: fairy-tales, nursery rhymes, TV adverts, street signage, dictionaries, the sound of my parents’ speaking/arguing in English-Gujarati (my mother’s mother tongue); the sound of how Other People spoke.

New West when I grew up there, was a well-settled place in the sense of its relation to the colonial history of the province, The Royal City, and as the daughter of a United Church Minister, I settled into place, if that makes sense. My first book, children of air india, un/authorized exhibits and interjections (Nightwood Editions, 2013), explores this idea a fair bit…

And yes, always, the river: I can’t get away from it. Every time I cross The Fraser into/out of Surrey, I have to look up, look at those grey waters, effluent-filled, that deep undertow current: I grew up hearing stories about the grasp of that current, how she’d take you in…”

Read Our Conversation Here

Tripwire 12 * AKA Vancouver: Writings from the Unceded Territories

My long poem, THOT-J-BAP, appears in Issue 12, of Oakland, CA’s Tripwire (David Buuck, editor) in a feature on Vancouver writers, including…

Jordan AbelGeorge BoweringLouis CabriJeff DerksenAmy D’AthMercedes EngRyan FitzpatrickSonnet L’Abbe, Danielle LaFranceChristine LeclercDonato ManciniRolf Maurerrob mclennanCecily NicholsonLisa Robertson, Stephen CollisFred WahRita Wong, and others…

…along with a special tribute to Peter Culley. Thrilled to keep this company and Unceded.

Issue Available Here

Dec 8: Open Mic with Surrey’s Poet Laureate

Poet Laureate Open Mic.CC.Dec.2017

You are invited to this meet n greet and Open Mic. Bring a page of your writing to read and share! Refreshments will be provided at this free event – register in person at City Centre Library or call 604-598-74256.

Date: Friday December 8
Time: 6:00pm-8:00pm
Place: Room 418, Surrey City Centre Library

Nov 3, THOT-J-BAP: extractions Book Launch

This week on Friday, I’ll be launching my new chapbook, THOT-J-BAP: extractions from Nomados Press alongside Marguerite Pigeon and her chapbook, My Model Poem. Hope to see you there!

Nomados Press Thot-J-Bap

Like the bees who populate it, Saklikar’s THOT-J-BAP is humming, productive, and vital, performing an urgent gathering of specimens amassed, dissipated, and recollected from which it extracts ‘those gems they would steal’: fragments of stories, of love, of violence, of remembering, of ‘what once was, compressed.’ This is fecund, fabulous work.”

–  Catriona Strang

I always have my eye out for a truly ambitious poetry—and here it is, epic in scope, running through its own newly-created dimension just outside of recognizable time and space, a mobile world moving by, line by line, touching “what hurts, what helps, what heals,” transformed. Saklikar manages a near perfect merger of forward-momentum narrative and paratactic detail where each word is a hypnotically pronounced incantation, the story pulled into glittering erotic fragments, each piece a world in itself, glowing, refracting, the ambition of the part to overwhelm the whole. THOT-J-BAP is poetry to lose and find yourself in. I’m hooked.” 

– Stephen Collis

Date: Friday, November 3 at 8 PM – 10 PM
Time: 8:00-10:00pm
Location: People’s Co-op Bookstore, 1391 Commercial Drive, Vancouver

Click Here for More Details