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PS Flight 752: Two Articles on Violence and Public Mourning

The missile strike against a civilian plane, PS Flight 752 on January 8, 2020 triggered grief and memories of a much earlier bombing on June 23, 1985.

Here are two articles that contemplate violence within the context of history and solidarity, as we both grieve for the families who lost loved ones and offer a few thoughts:

My Aunt Died in the Air India Bombing. The Iran Plane Crash Brought Back My Grief

I grew up reading Chatelaine, an iconic Canadian magazine geared to a female readership. This week they contacted me to write about grief and here’s a little of what I said:

Iran plane crash flight 752 memorial
People gather to remember victims of the plane crash in Iran in Vancouver, B.C. on January 11, 2020. (Photo, Mert Alper Dervis/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


I hate flying and will do anything to avoid air travel. Well-meaning friends often tease me, offering self-help tips: take melatonin, or a red-eye flight so that you can sleep.
I nod and smile, but inside, there’s a familiar sinking feeling, the same pit-of-the-stomach contraction that happens whenever images of plane crashes pop up on social media. Like they did on January 8, as the terrible news of the missile strike on Flight 752 began to saturate the media…”

Read the Full Article at Chateleine


Canada’s collective grief over the Ukrainian plane crash brings to mind the 1985 Air India tragedy

Dr. Angela Failler at the University of Winnipeg, recently published this very thoughtful piece at The Conversation about public mourning and the linkages between the two tragedies:

Flight PS752 Remembrance
A member of the Iranian community in Calgary lights a candle during a memorial for the victims of Flight PS752 crash. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol.


And so, as further details of the tragedy in Tehran unfold and political players in and beyond Canada negotiate their stakes, I expect that public memory will shift along with it, including how the incident and its casualties are remembered and understood.

This is how public memory works: When new information and investments become present, we tend to revise how we make sense of the past.”

Read the Full Article at The Conversation

Lunch Poems at SFU

Lunch Poems at SFU: Joanne Arnott and Michael Mirolla

Update: Lunch Poems is cancelled today due to snow closures at all SFU campuses.

 

Lunch Poems Jan 2020

Lunch Poems at SFU is a unique opportunity to celebrate the spoken word and is held the third Wednesday of every month, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., in the Teck Gallery at Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver Campus.

The raison d’être of Lunch Poems is to invite and welcome everyone to enjoy poetry in a relaxed and casual atmosphere: whether you are new to poetry or have had a long romance with it. We invite you to join us to lunch on words and feed your soul. No fees or registration. Just bring your lunch, curiosity, open mind and love of words.

More Details Here

Lunch Poems at SFU

Lunch Poems at SFU: Roy Miki and Mercedes Eng

 

Lunch Poems Dec 2019

Lunch Poems at SFU is a unique opportunity to celebrate the spoken word and is held the third Wednesday of every month, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., in the Teck Gallery at Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver Campus.

The raison d’être of Lunch Poems is to invite and welcome everyone to enjoy poetry in a relaxed and casual atmosphere: whether you are new to poetry or have had a long romance with it. We invite you to join us to lunch on words and feed your soul. No fees or registration. Just bring your lunch, curiosity, open mind and love of words.

More Details Here

Lunch Poems at SFU

Lunch Poems at SFU: Chantal Gibson and Marion Quednau

 

Lunch Poems November 2019

Lunch Poems at SFU is a unique opportunity to celebrate the spoken word and is held the third Wednesday of every month, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., in the Teck Gallery at Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver Campus.

The raison d’être of Lunch Poems is to invite and welcome everyone to enjoy poetry in a relaxed and casual atmosphere: whether you are new to poetry or have had a long romance with it. We invite you to join us to lunch on words and feed your soul. No fees or registration. Just bring your lunch, curiosity, open mind and love of words.

More Details Here

Events and readings

November 23 : A Reading with Chris Turnbull

Delighted to be reading with former Vancouverite Chris Turnbull at the People’s Co-op Bookstore on November 23 at 7PM:

“Chris Turnbull is the author of Continua (Ottawa: Chaudiere Books 2015; Picton: Invisible Publishing 2019) and [ untitled ] in o w n (Vancouver: CUE Books 2014), one of a trio of poetry books alongside work by Heather Hermant and angela rawlings. Chapbook publications include Shingles (Vancouver: Thuja 1999); continua 1-22 (Ottawa: above/ground 2010); and The Great Canadian (Buffalo: Low Frequency Press 2015), which combines images from Turnbull’s site-specific rout/e project and text from rawling’s forthcoming echolology. Undertones, a collaborative chapbook with text/artist Bruno Neiva, is emerging with Low Frequency Press in 2019.

In addition to new work, Renee Saklikar will read from her sci-fi epic chapbooks (highly collectible!): the first chapbook 2016 by the late Martha Reed (Nous Zot Press); the second, ‘After the Battle of Kingsway. The Bees’, (2016; 2019), above/ground press (finalist for the 2017 bpNichol award); the third, by Nomados Press (2017); and the fourth, ‘from The Book of Bramah'(2019), above/ground press.”

The launch is a free event, and gets underway at 7:00 pm. Located at 1391 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, V5L 3X5. See you there!