Events and readings, Listening to the Bees

May 25: Listening to the Bees – Victoria Book Launch

Listening-to-the-Bees-Evite-Victoria

Listening to the Bees, my latest collaboration with Mark Winston, will be launching in Victoria at the Fortune Gallery this May 25!

“Listening to the Bees is a collaboration between two writers who share a common passion for bees and for language. It combines Winston’s personal essays based on thirty years as a scientist in the field with the honey bee and Saklikar’s poems created in response to a rich scientific archive.”

Click here for Book Details

Listening to the Bees

SFU News: Why We Should Listen to the Bees

Mark Winston and Renee Saklikar
Image credit: Simon Fraser University News

SFU News has a nice piece up on Listening to the Bees, launching today at Surrey City Centre Library:

Listening to the Bees Book Launch Surrey

Some excerpts:

The book is a “call-and-response” collaboration between the two writers, who share a common passion for bees and language. It features a collection of essays by Winston on his 40-year career as a scientist studying bees and is interspersed with Saklikar’s eloquent poems.”

Mark Winston on the book:

The book is intended for a general audience, from those interested in bees, nature and science, to those who appreciate poetry. ‘The actual results of research, interesting as they are, are only the beginning of contemplating the mysteries that deep study of another organism can reveal,’ says Winston. ‘Listening to the bees connects us to the ineffable mysteries we will never resolve or fully understand, into the realm of wonder.’

Read the Article Here

Events and readings, Listening to the Bees

May 10: Listening to the Bees – Vancouver Book Launch

Listening to the Bees Vancouver Book Launch

Very excited to announce the first book launch for Listening to the Bees, my latest collaboration with Mark Winston, this May 10 at the Grand Luxe Hall in Vancouver:

“Listening to the Bees is a collaboration between two writers who share a common passion for bees and for language. It combines Winston’s personal essays based on thirty years as a scientist in the field with the honey bee and Saklikar’s poems created in response to a rich scientific archive.”

Click here for Book Details

Events and readings

Bee All You Can Be, by David Dalley

Lovely to read a summary of last week’s Hives, Honey, and Poetry event by David Dalley, with whom I had the privilege of collaborating with recently in Newton and at Surrey City Centre Library:

“…Renée Saklikar, Surrey’s first ever Poet Laureate,  Dr. Mark Winston, renowned bee scientist and Simon Fraser University professor, author of Bee Time: Lessons from the Hive, winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award (2015) for non-fiction, and Heidi Greco, celebrated Surrey poet and facilitator of audience participation.

Mark opened by introducing us to some of the science behind bees and their troubling disappearance. He then invited Renee to join him, and the two recited poetry, shared ideas and encouraged us to think creatively about how we might create a better world by being attentive to the lessons that bees have to offer.

Heidi wrapped up by inviting the audience to write a poem or two about bees. A few were read out loud, and more will be posted online shortly!”

Read the rest here

about doing the work

of bees and wings, reblogging Mark Winston’s essay

September Joyce Collingwood 2014 015One of my great delights is working on a series of bee poems based on the work of Dr. Mark Winston.

This Sunday at Word Vancouver, I read one of these bee poems from the lovely Cascadia chapbook (Leaf Press) with Heidi Greco and George Stanley and this morning, Mark sent me a link to his blog where he writes about his life and work as a bee scientist…

“Walking into an apiary is intellectually challenging and emotionally rich, sensual and riveting. Time slows down. Focus increases, awareness heightens, all senses captivated.

Lifting my smoker, I am totally in the present but also connected to memories of friends, fellow beekeepers and innumerable long days in other apiaries when we shared periods of tedium, hard physical labor and occasional glimpses of wisdom. These moments of understanding, penetrating the complexity of our usually unfathomable natural world, still take my breath away.”

– Bee Time: Lessons from the Hive

Read the piece here

 

thecanadaproject readings

Poets.ca: On Honey, Hives and Poetry

This piece first appeared on the League of Canadian Poets blog on April 24, 2015:

“Next I’ll speak about the celestial gift of honey”

~ Virgil, Book IV, Georgics

From the slow press of hours in ancient times to today’s digital staccato, poets obsesses about bees. For example, there’s Stephen Collis’ bee poems in his award winning poetry book, On the Material as well as Carol Ann Duffy’s The Bees, and of course, famously, Sylvia Plath’s “bee sequence” in Ariel and Yeats’ Lake Isle of Innisfree.

Bee poems pop out everywhere once you start looking, and you might find yourself clipping poems to carry around in your pocket, such as Eamon Grennan’s  delightful “Untitled [back they sputter]. Start googling any poetry website and you’ll quickly discover poems about bees, bee-keeping, hives and honey. As well-known bee expert, scientist and author, Dr. Mark Winston says, “Art with bees energizes our capacity to imagine and deepens our attentiveness to the world around us.” His latest book, Bee Time, Lessons from the Hive, includes environmental analysis, memoir, and a lyric prose meditation on bees, art and culture. In the research for his book, Dr. Winston connected with Vancouver poet, Renée Sarojini Saklikar, author of a life-long poem chronicle, thecanadaproject that includes, among other things, bee-poems.

This year, Saklikar and Winston will collaborate on a lyric prose-poetry performance for which Saklikar has written a sequence of bee poems in honour of, and using text from not only Virgil but also Winston’s scientific data and publications. In preparing for performance, Mark and Renée were delighted to learn of Rachel Rose’s call to poets to investigate, explore, and celebrate food and poetry. As the new City of Vancouver’s poet laureate, Rose’s vision shimmers “bee energy.” She writes, “we want to investigate the ways in which food is ‘personal, political, sensual and powerful.’” Saklikar, a League member who studied with Rachel Rose at Simon Fraser University’s The Writers Studio, saw a nexus of community connections beginning to form: what might poets, community, and bees get going in Vancouver? Continue reading “Poets.ca: On Honey, Hives and Poetry”